Pickled Ginger

Pickled ginger lasts for up to a year in the fridge, so you can make a large batch to eat with rice, sushi, or anything else you want. I use it in my homemade peanut sauce as a secret ingredient.

Pickled Ginger

  • Servings: 3-4 cups ginger
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces ginger (about 2 large heads)
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup sugar

Directions

  1. Peel the ginger with the back of the spoon.
  2. Cut the ginger extremely thin with a sharp knife or a mandolin
  3. Place the ginger in a bowl and sprinkle with the salt. Let sit for 10 minutes
  4. Bring a pot of water for a boil and add the ginger. Cook for 1-2 minutes.
  5. Strain the ginger, reserving the cooking liquid to drink(it is ginger tea!)
  6. In a large jar or container, add the. vinegars, water, and sugar. Mix until sugar is dissolved, and add the ginger.
  7. Allow the mixture to sit for 2 hours before eating. The pickled ginger will last for up to a year in the fridge.
  8. Note: you can adjust the vinegar and sugar ratio to your liking. I prefer mine less sweet.


Vegetable Scrap Broth

Save those scraps! Even if you are composting, finding a second use for your vegetable scraps is a great way to get the most out of all the food you buy.

Any vegetable scraps can be used for this broth except for large amounts of cruciferous vegetables scraps because they may impart a bitter flavors. I tend to use a majority of onion, carrot, celery, leeks, and kale scraps in my broths. Herbs such as rosemary, thyme, and sage are great additions as well. Now that I have so much stock from my vegetables scraps, I have been making amazing soups during these colder months.

When I buy a chicken, I try to fabricate the bird and save the carcass in the freezer until I have enough vegetables for a big pot of stock as well. Then, I will add all the scraps and carcass to the pot and make a chicken scrap broth!

This scrap broth is not an exact recipe, but one that can be easily bent to your preference and ingredients on hand. I fill a pot with about 4-6 quarts of water when I can fill a gallon size bag with vegetable scraps.

Bring the broth to a simmer, then reduce to the lowest setting and cook overnight on low, or for about 5-8 hours.

Strain out the scraps and store the broth in the fridge or freezer for future use in soups, sauces, or anywhere you would usually add water to give your dishes a new depth of flavor.

Vegetable Scrap Broth

  • Servings: 4 quarts
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4-6 quarts of water
  • gallon size bag of vegetable scraps
  • chicken carcass (optional)

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large pot.
  2. Bring to a low boil, then reduce the heat to the lowest setting and cook for 5-8 hours.
  3. Strain the scraps from the broth.
  4. Store in the fridge or freezer.

Apple Sauce and Apple Vinegar

I have a box of ‘second’ apples that I bought for $10 at a farmers market. Since I have all these apples, I am going to show you how to use them all up! The three ways I plan to use these apples is for apple sauce, apple cider vinegar, and spiced apple shrub.

Apples chopped for apple sauce before cooking

Apple Sauce

Ingredients

  • 15 pounds apples
  • 1-2 tablespoons cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup water

Directions

  1. Peel, core, and chop the apples into large chunks, reserving the cores and peels for scrap vinegar.
  2. Add the apples to a large pot with the water, cinnamon and salt. Cook over medium, or medium low heat for 2-3 hours until the the consistency is to your liking.
  3. Allow to cool and store in the fridge or freezer.

Apple scraps before sugar water is added to the jar
One week into fermentation
Apple cider vinegar after straining the apple scraps from the liquid

Apple Scrap Vinegar

  • Servings: 1-2 quarts
  • Print

Ingredients

  • apple scraps (cores and skins)
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/4 cup sugar

Directions

  1. Put the apple scraps in a large glass jar.
  2. Make a mixture of 4 cups of water and 1/4 cup of sugar. Dissolve the sugar, and add the sugar mixture to the space between the apple scraps in the jar.
  3. Make more sugar water if the apple scraps are not fully covered.
  4. Weigh down the apples so they are not exposed over the liquid with a fermentation glass weigh or a small glass jar.
  5. Cover the jar with a towel or fabric and allow to ferment for 1-2 weeks until bubbles stop forming.
  6. Once the bubbles stop forming, strain the apple scraps (they are compostable).
  7. Return the apple/sugar liquid to the jar and cover with a cloth or fabric.
  8. Allow the liquid to ferment for 4-8 weeks until sour to your liking.

Garlic Confit and Garlic Oil

Garlic confit. Spread it over everything and thank me later.

Confit is a method of cooking slowly over a long period of time time, usually in fat. This long, slow cooking results in garlic that is creamy, sweet, and spreadable, as well as a garlic infused oil that is begging to be used in all your next cooking endeavors.

Garlic Confit

  • Servings: 8 oz oil/8 oz garlic spread
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups garlic cloves, whole
  • 1 cup oil

Directions

  1. Add the garlic and oil to a pot.
  2. Cook over low heat for 2-3 hours.
  3. Separate the oil and garlic into two different containers.
  4. Mash the garlic until it is uniform and spreadable